Tony W. Cartledge


Dr. Cartledge joined the Campbell University Divinity School faculty as Professor of Old Testament in 2007. His research and interests range from the Hebrew Bible to storytelling to the life and work of Baptists and the role of faith in contemporary life. Through his past and present roles as a professor, journalist, pastor and author, Cartledge travels widely, preaches often, and speaks to diverse audiences on a wide range of topics.

 

Topics: Hebrew Bible / New Testament studies, Baptists in the world, Creative Writing, Storytelling, Preaching

Available for: Pulpit Supply / Lectures / Seminars / Bible Studies

Travels from: Raleigh, NC // Flies from: RDU

Tony Cartledge’s main area of teaching is Old Testament, but he also teaches courses on writing and ministry. As a former pastor, working journalist, frequent blogger, and author of books on multiple subjects, Cartledge has a diverse background and wide-ranging interests. Seeking to think theologically and encourage others to do the same, his best gifts may be curiosity and communication. 

Cartledge graduated magna cum laude from the University of Georgia in 1973 and earned a number of academic awards while completing a Master of Divinity degree at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (1982). While at Southeastern, he published his first academic article, “Samuel Cartledge, Colonial Saul of Tarsus,” in Viewpoints, the journal of the Georgia Baptist Historical Society. Cartledge went on to gain an academic scholarship and earn a Doctor of Philosophy degree from the graduate school of religion at Duke University, passing his preliminary exams “with honors.” He published two academic articles as a student and won an award for the best student paper presented at the Southeast regional meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature in 1987. A revised version of his dissertation was published by Sheffield Academic Press as Vows in the Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East.
 
Cartledge served as pastor of five different Baptist churches over a 26-year period, the most recent being a 10-year stint at Woodhaven Baptist Church near Apex, N.C. During his time as pastor, Cartledge contributed to a number of professional journals including Proclaim, The Deacon, and The Biblical Illustrator. For six years, he wrote commentaries for the Smyth & Helwys Formations curriculum that were published in Baptists Today. He also contributed to academic publications including The Catholic Bible Quarterly, The Mercer Dictionary of the Bible, The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, The New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology, and two books of collected articles.
 
In 1998, Cartledge was tapped as editor of the Biblical Recorder, a newspaper for Baptists affiliated with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina. For nine years he traveled widely, speaking in churches across North Carolina, writing about Baptist work in the state, and covering meetings of the Southern Baptist Convention, the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, and the Baptist World Alliance. A special interest in partnership missions and disaster relief took him to Alaska, Mississippi (post-Katrina), Armenia, Honduras, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand, South Africa, and Sri Lanka. Cartledge’s writing won journalism awards for both news and opinion writing from the Baptist Communicators Association and the North Carolina Society of Historians. During his time at the Recorder Cartledge continued to publish in the academic field, including a 747 page commentary on 1 & 2 Samuel for the Smyth & Helwys commentary series (2001). He contributed “A House for God and a House for David” to Word and World (Fall 2003) and was a contributor to and guest editor of the Review and Expositor’s Spring 2002 issue, which focused on 1-2 Samuel. During that period Cartledge also published a collection of devotional columns called Intrigued, How I Love to Proclaim It (2003), and co-wrote, with Jan C. Rush, A Whole New World: Life After Bethany (2005).
 
While serving as a full-time professor at Campbell University Divinity School, Cartledge also holds a part-time position as contributing editor for Baptists Today, a national journal for moderate-leaning Baptists. His work there, along with various appointed roles within the Baptist World Alliance, have taken him to Falls Church, VA; Honolulu, HI; Birmingham, England; Mexico City, Mexico; Accra, Ghana; Prague, the Czech Republic; Ede, the Netherlands, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; and Santiago, Chile.
 
In addition to scores of Baptist-related articles published in Baptists Today, Cartledge contributed 18 articles to the New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible and written book reviews for the Review and Expositor and Perspectives in Religion since coming to Campbell. He has contributed both commentaries and lesson series for the Formations curriculum, and saw earlier materials reprinted in separate volumes (Approaching a Missional Mindset, with Bo Prosser, 2008; and Old Testament Promises to God, with Cecil Sherman, 2009). He wrote the biblical commentary in Job: Into the Fire, Out of the Ashes for the 2007 Smyth & Helwys Annual Bible Study, and in 2008 he published Telling Stories: Tall Tales and Deep Truths, a collection of sermons that incorporate original short stories. A collection of Bible studies called Sessions with Samuel was published in 2010, and a similar book on Genesis in 2012, along with an article on pilgrimage for Duke’s Judaica series, published by Eisenbraun’s. From 2008-10, Cartledge served on the steering committee for “Elevating Preaching,” a conference associated with the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship of North Carolina. In a different vein, he cowrote, with Bob Barker, a memoir entitled I'm in Cells: the Captivating Story of Bob Barker and the Bob Barker Company (2012).
 
Cartledge is a frequent speaker, Bible study and seminar leader in churches, campus groups and to other audiences throughout North Carolina and as far away as Belize, Mexico City, Armenia, South Africa, and Chile. He blogs regularly at www.tonycartledge.com.

Pulpit Supply
 
Cartledge enjoys both preaching and “rubbing elbows” with the members of local churches. In preaching, he seeks to present an apt mix of biblical scholarship, cultural awareness, and creative elements designed to encourage active listening while pointing to important connections between the biblical story and contemporary life.
 
Lecture Series:
 
Bible Studies
Previous Bible book studies taught include Genesis, Exodus, 1 & 2 Samuel, Job, Ecclesiastes, Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, along with the gospels, Acts, 1 Corinthians and several other New Testament books. Bible book studies seek to present an understanding of the books within their initial context and an application of their message for today’s believers.
 
Baptist Identity
Baptists are constantly changing, even in their understanding of what it means to be Baptist. Previous lectures include topics related to Baptist history, Baptist distinctives, and different ways of being Baptist in America. As an “insider” at the Baptist State Convention during some of its most tumultuous years, Cartledge is often asked to explain the changes that have taken place within the Southern Baptist Convention and the Baptist State Convention during the past three decades.
 
David and Leadership
What makes an effective leader? This series of lectures examines the life of the legendary King David with an eye toward what his practices and experiences – both positive and negative – can teach church and denominational leaders about the subject of leadership.
 
The Care and Feeding of the Soul
What does it mean to have a soul? Did Old Testament and New Testament writers have differing opinions on that? How do their teachings relate to modern psychology? This series of lectures on personal spirituality draws on biblical case studies to help listeners to identify, examine, and properly care for their soul.
 
The Ministry of Writing
How do articles for a church newsletter and a local newspaper differ? How can ministers write more meaningful or persuasive opinion articles? How can good writing improve preaching? How can churches effectively use communications technology to advance their ministries? These seminar sessions review the ins and outs, do’s and don’ts of writing a variety of materials in ministry settings.
 
Storytelling as Ministry
Why are stories so meaningful to us? What makes a good story? How can ministers use storytelling to improve their preaching or teaching? These issues can be addressed in either a lecture or seminar setting.

To inquire about Dr. Cartledge’s availability, please send an email to: cartledge@campbell.edu.  Please indicate the type of event you have in mind along with information about the proposed date, suggested topic, and the intended audience.